Form 1099 Filing Requirements

Form 1099 Filing Requirements

If you made a payment during the calendar year **as part of your trade or business**, you are likely required to file a 1099 or Information Return with the IRS.

Form 1099-MISC would be issued for payments, in the course of your trade or business for:

  • Services performed by independent contractors or others that are not your employees (to individuals or other businesses) of $600 or more to each payee
  • Prizes and awards of $600 or more
  • Rent of $600 or more
  • Royalties $10 or more
  • To physicians, physicians’ corporation or other supplier of health and medical services of $600 or more
  • For a purchase of fish from anyone engaged in the trade or business of catching fish of $600 or more
  • Substitute dividends or tax exempt interest payments and you are broker of $10 or more
  • Crop insurance proceeds of $600 or more
  • Gross proceeds of $600 or more paid to an attorney

Form 1099-MISC would also be used to report direct sales of $5,000 of consumer products to a buyer for resale anywhere other than a permanent retail establishment.

Form 1099-INT is used to report interest you paid on a business debt to someone of at least $10.

Form 1099-DIV is used to report dividends or other distributions to a company shareholder.  The minimum amount to be reported is $10.

Form 1099-R is used to report distributions from retirement plans.

**Trade or business**

If you are not engaged in a trade or business, you are not required to file 1099 forms.  A question that sometimes arises is, “do I need to give my lawn care service a 1099.”  It depends…if you pay a lawn care service to take care of your personal residence, then you are not required to issue a 1099 because there is no trade or business.  If you pay that same lawn care service to tend to your business property, then you are required to issue a 1099 unless an exception applies.

Owning a rental property constitutes a trade or business.  Paying someone over $600 for the upkeep or maintenance of your property could create a filing requirement.

Exceptions to general rule for issuing 1099s

You do not have to issue 1099s to companies that are incorporated unless it is for medical or legal services.  A company is incorporated if it is established as a C Corporation or an S Corporation.  You must issue a 1099 to a partnership or an LLC unless the business is taxed as a Corporation.  See W-9 Forms below.

If you paid someone under $600, you also are not required to issue a 1099 to that vendor.

W-9 Forms

It is a best practice for you to have a W-9 Form on file for each of your vendors.  The W-9 Form, prepared and signed by the vendor, provides information to the company that is necessary to prepare 1099 Forms.  Information includes the vendor’s name, address, tax identification number or social security number, and type of business.  If the W-9 form indicates that the company is a corporation or an S Corporation, you do not need to file a 1099 form unless they provide medical or legal services.  If the IRS questions why you did not issue a 1099 to XYZ LLC (an LLC taxed as an S Corporation), the signed W-9 Form is your proof that the company certified to you that they were incorporated.

Due Dates and Penalties

1099s are due to the recipients and to the IRS by January 31st this year if you are reporting nonemployee compensation in box 7.  Penalties for failure to file 1099s vary but are anywhere from $50 to $260 per 1099.

More info…

Most companies are required to prepare 1099s…are you ready to do so?  The due dates for filing with the IRS have been pushed up this year so get ready now for filing those 1099s in January!  The information presented above is a summary of some important 1099 facts; however, should you need to see the detailed rules, click below to access the IRS Instructions – 2016 General Instructions for Certain Information Returns.

Sincerely‚
Rhonda Guidry
Rhonda L. Guidry, CPA is a Partner of PRM based in the Lafayette, LA office. Rhonda's practice consists of tax planning and preparation for individuals and businesses, including bookkeeping and payroll services. Rhonda can be reached via email at rhonda@prmcpa.com or 337-406-1099 X 102.

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